humit - The social music sharing and discovery app | Product Hunt

Telling me you don’t listen to music is as good as telling me you’re insane. It’s difficult, downright impossible I’d say, to find a person whose days go by without a tune to turn to. As much as we all listen to music and as much as music consumption has evolved, from records on turntables to sharing music files through Bluetooth to streaming music on Spotify, have our taste buds for music reading evolved? I bet they have because we all seem pretty done with Pitchfork flooding our feeds as the only relevant music news source. To bring the music-blogs-hierarchy into balance, and pepper our feed and inboxes with some diversity, we’ve curated a list of music blogs that can keep every and any music fan hooked and reaching for the subscribe button. You’ll find something for every taste bud of yours.

Aquarium Drunkard:

Originating in 2005 and based in Los Angeles, Aquarium Drunkard is an eclectic audio journal loaded with daily reviews, interviews, features, podcasts and sessions. Well-written and interesting, music lovers will get lost in the joy of reading all the content spread out over their blog. The blog has an AD Interview section, a “Mixtape” section, that reviews albums from artists going way back to the 60s and 70s, and podcasts. There’s also access to their weekly newsletter archives. In their own words, “Digging globally, AD bridges contemporary sounds with psych, jazz, avant-garde, folk, garage, funk and beyond. For heads, by heads.”

Pigeons & Planes:

This blog is a place where you can keep up with new music across all genres, from mainstream hip-hop to experimental pop, and from all corners of the globe. Their name “Pigeons and Planes” is a great representation of the kind of artists that you could find here: A pigeon is a perfect symbol for the emerging artists who are trying to survive in an urban world. The planes represent the mainstream artists—finely tuned machines associated with major corporations. They even have a YouTube channel that has great content.

Stereogum:

This award-winning music blog was founded in 2002 and was one of the first mp3 blogs to be out on the internet. The site was named after a lyric from the song 'Radio #1' by the French electronic duo Air. The blog features articles on new music, columns, interviews, reviews, and indie rock gossip. Stereogum was the first major publication to write about future superstar acts like Arcade Fire, Vampire Weekend and Billie Eilish. Popular musicians have been known to participate in Stereogum's active comments section, such as Father John Misty, Weezer's Rivers Cuomo, and Fleet Foxes' Robin Pecknold.

BrooklynVegan:

This blog, founded in 2004 by David Levine, is headquartered in Brooklyn, New York, and originally on vegan food and the music community in and around New York City, before broadening its scope to covering musical artists and events worldwide. The multi-genre, mostly-music blog focuses on international music news, album-focused and live show reviews, pictures, festivals, tour dates, gossip, tips, song and album streams, videos, industry and tech news, special events, and much more. They also produce a lot of live events and have a radio show on SiriusXMU.

Xune Mag:

Xune Mag is well-laid out, and designed for listening to, and reading about, new indie music from around the world. They add regular reviews on the latest releases, with a teaser of each song they review. They also include Live Reviews where Xune contributors attend live shows and report back. The site is full of excellent videos from emerging artists that you could easily miss (just because there is so much music out there).

Shameless plug-in since you're already here: humit blog is THE place to be if you haven't noticed already. With opinion pieces from team humit, guides and updates on anything music, and fresh recommendations, humit has ticked all the boxes with its blog AND also comes with its own newsletter that comes in fresh every week, sitting in your inbox ready for your consumption. Read it, Hear it, humit!